Bill Leslie

What happens to a sculpture when it is filmed and photographed?

What happens to a sculpture when it is filmed and photographed? How is it effected and changed by this process of capture and representation?  Can sculpture and media act together to produce something which has its own particular force and existence? Can a mediated object be considered as an art object in its own right?

Bill Leslie

This practice-led enquiry will open out the possibilities of the pictured sculpture, conceiving of the act of mediation as integral to the creation of the art object, a radical transformation and fundamental constitutive act without which the object would not be what it is. Using various representational media – still, moving and virtual – I will test the power of the media to transform the sculptural object giving to it unexpected qualities, altering its perceived scale and materiality, finding ways for the pictured sculpture to exceed its origins entering into the viewer’s perception as something distinct yet inseparable from the process of mediation.

This research will take into account key philosophical debates around the nature of objects and of representational media, alongside phenomenological analysis articulating the complex and intertwined relationship of object, and the media through which it reaches the viewer, not merely as something seen visually but perceived bodily. This will be underpinned by an analysis of how the art object has been forged historically in relation to the photographic image and how artists over the past century have used representational media to put the integrity of the art object into question. This research will create new understandings of the nature and possibilities of the pictured sculpture, establishing it as a locus of practical and theoretical inquiry which is at the heart of image production in contemporary art.

billleslie.co.uk

Jenna Collins

We Are the Road

Contemporary archival art practices utilise their artefacts in a variety of ways. My approach foregrounds certain artefact’s own internal and pre-existing complexities, separate from the complexities of an archive. This is distinct from archival art practices that focus on specific histories and their misrepresentation or absence; and practices that critique the archival construct itself.

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We Are the Road, 2017

I undertake the research through the production of moving image and sound artworks that seek to adopt and critically reformulate the processes of commercial film production and the artefacts it produces (such as the location report and the screenplay). This manoeuvre responds to the notion of instrumentality, criticised in philosophical thinking about technology.

The artefacts located by this project are the material remains of non-technical aspects (communities, ideas, events) that have accumulated around the development of moving image and screen-based technological products since the late 20th century. Their continued existence as digital files and second-hand products is not the result of an organised recognition of their worth, rather, they have accumulated in the wake of technological advancement as so much junk floating around at the margins of the archive. The intention of the project is not to rehabilitate overlooked materials but to explore the idea that these unheroic fragments and their stubborn specificities actualise moments of lived experience entangled with technology.

jennacollins.com

Dr Rachel Cattle

I am a Stylus: Play, Erase, Replay and Overdub as Strategies for Contemporary Fine Art Practice

Climbing the stairs and stepping out, its pitch black. I’m disorientated, my eyes are wide open, but I can’t make anything out. Once they become accustomed, I make out tiny lights winking blue and yellow coming from banks of electronic equipment, linked together by long black wires. Thinner brightly coloured wires hang in coils across the space, looping down between the equipment, a series of receivers, amplifiers and tuners, the debris of an abandoned radio station. I notice that everything is connected.

Rachel Cattlesmall

The air is soft, malleable, and as I start to feel my way around my fingers leave small indents. How to convey this? ((((((((((((((((())))))) ((((((((((((((((()))))))))))))))) I turn up the sound and you hear a woman’s voice softly humming on a repeated loop.

rachelcattle.wordpress.com