Mandy Ure

Associate Professor, Head of Department of Fine Art

In Mandy Ure’s paintings there is an absurd investment, a committed doubt, in producing paintings that address temporality, belief and scepticism in a paintings ability to signify anything. Her paintings rehearse the rhetoric of painting, using the precedents and conventions of mark making, picturing and construction. These mechanistic methods are absorbed and conflated with an expressionless declaration of physical fact and a fascination with the desire for a potentially stable pictorial referent. The paintings fluctuate – by way of production and forms implied – between a simulation of meaningful activity and a belief that the temporality of painting can (still) allow for an alternate (s)pace of understanding.

mandy_ure
Painting no. 108, 2016. Credit: Andy Keate

Recent research includes exhibitions Native, Durden and Ray, LA, Here, there and somewhere in between, Horatio Jr, London, Welcome to Corfu, Depot, London and symposium ‘Women; Art, Books and Printed Matter’, Hauser and Wirth, Somerset.

Louis Nixon

Professor, Associate Dean Research

My research is underpinned by an on-going engagement with an expanded sculptural practice. I produce kinetic sculptures, sound works, films and paintings, which combine a manipulation of technology with the creation of new modes of presentation.

I continue to define my work as part of an expanded practice of sculpture, which experiments with new ways of configuring sculpture in a wider social context.

A developing research theme, which equates with the physical and political components of landscape is encapsulated in the idea of borders. Recent work traces borders, most often making journeys by car and travelling the boundary of a landscape, particular site or territory where a route of circumvention may be dictated for geographical or political reasons.

louis
Black Rock, 2017. Jesmonite, paint, motors, micro controller and ultra sonic sensors. 300cm x 200 cm x 200cm.

Black Rock (pictured) is a sculpture that looks like a rock, it has motors and sensors which make it move forwards and backwards across a space or landscape, changing its direction when it encounters another object.

Volker Eichelmann

Associate Professor, Director of Postgraduate Research CARC

VolkerEichelmann.jpg

In 1925, Stephen Tennant (1906–1987), perhaps the most intriguing of England’s ‘Bright Young Things’, contemplated a novel about “high life with a capital H & full of crude impossibilities”. He favoured amongst other titles The Monkey House, as well as Gutters of Gold. Despite his elaborate preparations, this book, like so many others imagined by Tennant during his life in a sequestered Wiltshire manor house, was never to materialise. Volker Eichelmann has resurrected Gutters of Gold as an intriguing visual essay. In this publication Eichelmann’s paintings, collages and photographs overlap and underlie Tennant’s drawings and personal ephemera. Reflections on landscape gardens and water-features, Greek antiquities and ruination, horticulture and eighteenth century découpage emerge as joint preoccupations that shift and expand in proximity as they unfold in a succession of scenarios conceived by Eichelmann under evocative chapter headings.

(from: Volker Eichelmann with Stephen Tennant, Gutters of Gold, Black Dog Publishing, 2017)

Jeanine Richards

Associate Professor, Joint School Director, Research

Jeanine Richards has worked with Charlotte Cullinan as part of an artist duo since 1998. They initially collaborated as artlab and subsequently began working as Cullinan Richards in 2006.

Cullinan and Richards have chosen to work within a tight partnership that facilitates engagement with a wider set of conceptual frameworks, with support structures central to their art making.

In past exhibitions Cullinan Richards investigated expanded definitions of making and activating paintings through works created in the studio and on site, using exhibitions to express abstraction and figuration as inseparable concepts and an interconnected material instability.

Recent shows have extended these interests into fracturing and dualities associated with new ideas around re-evaluating archives and a feminine materiality. The overall conceptual processes include staging and re-staging works, performance events, display strategies and repositioning histories and ideas in favor of the ‘Feminine’.

Cullinan Richardssmall.jpg
Feeling guilty about painting, 2017. For Goodbye Charles, Charles H Scott Gallery, Vancouver.

Goodbye Charles, Charles H Scott Gallery, Vancouver (2017), Of Other Spaces: Where Does Gesture Become Event? Parts I, II Cooper Gallery DJCAD Dundee (2016); No Fun Without EU – Artists in Common, Vyner Street, London (2016); Display Show, Eastside Projects, Birmingham (2015-16); DORA, Stanley Picker Gallery (2015); Paradigm Store, Howick Place, London (2014); The Ultimate Materiality of Women Part III, Visual Arts Centre, Scunthorpe (2013); STAG, Dispari&Dispari Gallery, Italy, (2013);
As a reflection of their interest in artists providing platforms to support other artworks, in 2006 they established the Savage School Window Gallery using the window of their studio on Vyner Street, London to display texts by writers, artists and curators. In 2013 they changed this into 4COSE, collaborating with curator Andrea Sassi, to create an Italian grocery shop-as-artwork open for artists interventions and top quality parmesan cheese.

cullinanrichardscollapse.com

Dr Sarah Bennett

Head of School Art & Architecture

SarahBennett_Fagotto 2014
Fagotto, 2014

In her artistic research Bennett critiques the historical and contemporary contexts of psychiatric provision through embodied actions, digital recording methods and site-based interventions. Her four channel video installation Safe-keeping (Custodia) (2014) was developed through an invitation to work on an interdisciplinary and international research project Geographies of affect and memory at the Museo Laboratorio Della Mente, in Rome. The project explored the creative methods by which the museum constructs a contemporary mental health promotion message by forcing an emotional engagement with histories and memories of institutionalisation and the phenomenon of mental illness. Related projects include: Reformations (2010) and Institutional Traits (2012).  Her published conference papers explore links between sited art practices, psychiatry, cultural geography, visual anthropology, museology and architecture.

sarahbennett.org.uk

Jo Addison

Joint Course Leader / Senior Lecturer BA Fine Art

 The relationship between objects and the body, and of objects to one another is intrinsic to the haptic and spatial curiosity at the heart of Addison’s sculptural research. Drawing from Bruno Latour, James Elkin, Jane Bennet’s theories on things, and Tim Ingold and Richard Sennet’s writing on making, she implements methods by which her decisions are governed by the behaviour of materials. Additionally, in collaboration with Natasha Kidd, Jo is engaged in a collaborative practice through which they explore learning as form. To date, this has included the production of a number of significant educational resources, objects and events, participation in educational research groups and contributions to national and international conferences and symposia.

Jo Addison
Bisanbos, 2015. Hanging object, mixed materials, jesmonite, 200mm diameter (approx)

Recent activities include: No Working Title, Tate Exchange and Blip Blip Blip, Gettin’ the Heart Ready, The Royal Standard; Good Things to Come, The Gallery at Plymouth College of Art; Buffetd’art, Meinblau Gallery, Berlin; Stop Bugging Me | Frame 3, Tintype London 2015; Alioli, Outpost Norwich 2015; Combines #1, Model Liverpool 2014; Ideas are Faster, Five Years London 2012; Easy does it, David Dale Gallery Glasgow, Aid & Abet Cambridge, Supercollider Blackpool 2013.

joaddison.com
instagram/joaddisonartist
tintypegallery.com/artists/jo-addison/
noworkingtitle.co.uk
instagram/nwtinstruct
noticer.uk

Zoe Childerley

Senior Lecturer, Photography

zoechilderley

Through her practice-based research, Zoe has explored the rural experience and relationship to place, how this forms identity and represents belonging told through story. She is interested in landscape, the concept of wilderness and the search for a primordial connection. Her work in the American desert demonstrates a particular interest in combining a desire to experience the ‘sublime’ with the inexplicable seduction of the abyss. She explores the precarious nature of the photographic medium itself, where the truth is always interpreted, testing the narrative potential of photography in relation to its abstract capacities. Zoe is expanding her approach to sound, drawing and text, exploring how the media intertwine with her photographic practice, to express a narrative around territory and cultural identity on UK borders, building on research themes in her practice, of nationhood, landscape and connection to place. Zoe is interested in how the landscape shapes society, how “place” is constituted, deconstructed, augmented, discussed, experienced.

zoechilderley.co.uk

Charlotte Cullinan

Professor of Fine Art, Course Leader MA Art and Space and MFA

Charlotte Cullinan has worked with Jeanine Richards as part of an artist duo since 1998. They initially collaborated as artlab and subsequently began working as Cullinan Richards in 2006.

Cullinan and Richards have chosen to work within a tight partnership that facilitates engagement with a wider set of conceptual frameworks, with support structures central to their art making.

In past exhibitions Cullinan Richards investigated expanded definitions of making and activating paintings through works created in the studio and on site, using exhibitions to express abstraction and figuration as inseparable concepts and an interconnected material instability.

Recent shows have extended these interests into fracturing and dualities associated with new ideas around re-evaluating archives and a feminine materiality. The overall conceptual processes include staging and re-staging works, performance events, display strategies and repositioning histories and ideas in favor of the ‘Feminine’

Cullinan Richardso
Pleisto-scene, 2017. For Goodbye Charles, Charles H Scott Gallery, Vancouver.

Goodbye Charles, Charles H Scott Gallery, Vancouver (2017), Of Other Spaces: Where Does Gesture Become Event? Parts I, II Cooper Gallery DJCAD Dundee (2016); No Fun Without EU – Artists in Common, Vyner Street, London (2016); Display Show, Eastside Projects, Birmingham (2015-16); DORA, Stanley Picker Gallery (2015); Paradigm Store, Howick Place, London (2014); The Ultimate Materiality of Women Part III, Visual Arts Centre, Scunthorpe (2013); STAG, Dispari&Dispari Gallery, Italy, (2013);

As a reflection of their interest in artists providing platforms to support other artworks, in 2006 they established the Savage School Window Gallery using the window of their studio on Vyner Street, London to display texts by writers, artists and curators. In 2013 they changed this into 4COSE, collaborating with curator Andrea Sassi, to create an Italian grocery shop-as-artwork open for artists interventions and top quality parmesan cheese.

cullinanrichardscollapse.com

Adam Gillam

Senior Lecturer/Course Leader BA Fine Art

Revelling in material and visual flippancy, Adam Gillam fidgets, probes and tweaks the abundant dark matter of studio experimentation and collected pound-shop tat. The resulting images, objects and accumulations present a potential, momentary resolution between improvisation and refinement.

adamgillam

Adam Gillam studied at Liverpool John Moores University from 1991-1994 and at The Royal Academy Schools, London, from 1994-1997 and is currently represented by Tintype Gallery, London.

Adam Gillam currently lives and works in London.

Mark Harris

Associate Professor in Fine Art

Mark Harris’ key area of research and specialism is the history of the printed image and the processes and journey it takes through reproduction, translation and documentation. His own practice is informed by the language of print, using discarded publications as material to create collages, sculptures and multiples that explore themes of Utopian landscapes and interpretations of unrealised architectural schemes and models.

Mark Harris
Pro-Patria EGH5 (160 x x120cm) collage on canvas, 2016

He has presented at International Print Symposiums in China and New Zealand. Recent exhibitions are a solo show at the De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill, UK, and the 2015 London Open at the Whitechapel Gallery. In 2016 he was invited to give a Public Lecture at The Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow, Russia, in response to the exhibition Proof: Work of Francisco Goya, Sergei Eisenstein, and Robert Longo.

markharrisworks.com
instagram.com/markharrisworks

Dr Claire M. Holdsworth

Early Career Research Fellow

An archivist and researcher, Holdsworth specialises in British artists’ moving image.

ClaireMHoldsworthsmall.jpg

By considering the voice and authorship her work investigates narratives and narration – ‘aural’ histories and the voice – exploring sound, the archive and historiography. Recent research mines intersections between experimental sounds, films and videos of the 1970s and 1980s using archives and interviews, with projects/writings often extending to the archive, feminist theory and social collectives. Parallel research interests include kinetic art, the artists Stefan and Franciscka Themerson, computer art and media theory. As a researcher interested in sound and discussion she organises events and when based in the British Artists’ Film and Video Study Collection at Central Saint Martins (UAL) during her AHRC funded PhD, co-organised the symposium ‘Writing Histories of the Moving Image’ (CSM, 2015). Holdsworth has written for Vertigo, the anthology Other Cinemas (ed. Clayton and Mulvey, May 2017) and the Moving Image Review and Art Journal.

kingston.academia.edu/ClaireMHoldsworth

Andrew Hunt

Early Career Research Fellow

Andrew Hunt is a curator and writer based in London. He is currently a Research Fellow in the Faculty of Art, Design & Architecture at Kingston University and Co-Director of Reading International. Recent independent projects include ‘As You Change So Do I’ a series of public art commissions for Luton, UK (2016 to 2019), ‘The Green Ray’, Wilkinson Gallery, London and ‘Concerning Concrete Poetry’, Badischer Kunstverein, Karlsruhe (both 2016).From 2008 to 2014 he was Director of Focal Point Gallery in Southend-on-Sea, and in 2012 he was a member of the Turner Prize jury. He contributes to magazines and journals such as Art MonthlyDomusfriezeMousse Magazine, and TATE ETC., and is founding editor of the Slimvolume imprint, which to date has published editions and books by over 250 artists.

Andrew Hunt, cover of Jeffrey Dennis 'Ringbinder', 2017
Cover of Jeffrey Dennis Ringbinder, 2017.

readinginternational.org
slimvolume.org

Dr Dean Kenning

Research Fellow in Fine Art

There are two main aspects to my art practice. Firstly art as a form of generative exploratory communication and thinking through drawing. This includes allegorical and diagrammatic based philosophical, political and economic investigations such as the Metallurgy and Capital projects, as well as the pedagogical Social Body Mind Maps. Secondly, material object based work that is compulsive, humorous and engages a B-movie horror aesthetic. In particular my kinetic rubber and sound sculptures. The two aspects come together most clearly in video and performance work. I often work as part of art groups. My work has been shown at the ICA, Grundy Art Gallery, BAK and the Whitechapel Gallery.

Dean Kenning
Metallurgy

I have written on art and politics, ‘idiot art’, and art education, publishing in journals such as Art Monthly, Third Text and Mute, and co-organising symposia at Tate Modern, Whitechapel and the ICA. At Kingston I have published a series of booklets based on transcripts from the Stanley Picker Public Lectures series.

deankenning.com

Katy MacLeod

Reader, Fine Art

Art research, particularly within the framing of a PhD: artists’ research processes specific to the practice of Art; PhD submissions, especially written texts and their relation to PhD exhibitions and ensuing research.

Katy MacLeodsmall

Funded research, including AHRC, into student and supervisor experience of PhDs in Fine Art;  examples of PhD, Fine Art submissions, Macleod, K & Holdridge, L, 2001-2003;  artist researchers’ specific approaches to research subject identification and related research processes through to submission, Macleod, K & Chapman, N, 2009-2012;  particular thought processes inherent to and engendered by art practice research and their broader relevance to other research arenas.

Research training aimed at underpinning art practice research;  also experimental writing;  research group collaboration and reading group work; Art theorisation.

katymacleod.org.uk
www.routledge.com

Mike Nelson

Professor of Fine Art

Mike Nelson’s work has centred on the transformation of narrative structure to spatial structure, and on the objects placed within them, immersing the viewer and agitating their perception of these environments. The narratives employed by the artist are not teleological, but multi-layered, and often fractured to the extent that they could be described as a semblance of ‘atmospheres’, put together to give a sense of meaning. The more discrete sculptural works are informed by this practice, often relying on their ambiguity to fade in and out of focus, as a sculpture or thing of meaning, and back to the very objects or material from which they are made. By working in this way the more overtly political aspects of the early works have become less didactic, allowing for an ambiguity of meaning, both in the way that they are experienced and understood. This has led to the possibility of the viewer being coerced into a state where the understanding of the varied structures of their existence, both conscious and sub-conscious, are made tangible.

MikeNelson.jpg
I, IMPOSTER, 2011. Installation view, 54th Venice Biennale, British Pavilion, Venice, 2011. Photo: Cristiano Corte. Courtesy the artist and 303 Gallery, New York; Galleria Franco Noero, Turin; Matt’s Gallery, London; and neugerriemschneider, Berlin.

Professor Elizabeth Price

London-based artist Elizabeth Price (British, b. 1966) creates richly multi-layered narrative moving image works made specifically for gallery environments. Often beginning with research undertaken in archives and museum collections, Price draws on varying references, such as architectural sites, social and political histories, as well as and the language of advertising copy. Composed of collaged imagery – analogue and digital photography, animation, and motion graphics – Price’s works almost always include scrolling text, sometimes read out loud by a narrator’s computerised voice set against a musical background. Through the artist’s choice of composition, archival footage is brought into conversation with digitally rendered imagery, blurring the boundary between historical fact and fiction, real and imagined narratives. Editing plays a key role in Price’s practice, and her arresting works are widely regarded for the interplay of the visual and aural – the rapid succession of imagery combined with layered soundtracks.

ep
A RESTORATION 2016, 2 channel digital video. Courtesy the artist.

In 2012 Price was awarded the Turner Prize for her solo exhibition ‘HERE’ at the Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead. The same year she also won the Paul Hamlin Award for artists. In 2013 she was awarded the Contemporary Art Society Annual Award, a commission prize which enable her to make a work for the collection of the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. She was featured in the British Art Show 2011, and has since had solo presentations at Bloomberg International and Chisenhale Gallery London; The New Museum, New York; Julia Stoschek Collection, Düsseldorf; The Swedish Contemporary Art Foundation, Stockholm; Kunsthalle Winterthur, Switzerland, the Musée d’art Contemporain de Montréal and the Neuer Berliner Kunstverien, Berlin.

Forthcoming she will be presenting major solo exhibitions at ISAW, New York and the Chicago Institute of Art in 2017; The Walker, Minneapolis; Nottingham Contemporary; Berlin Natural History Museum in 2018 and a major survey show at the Whitworth Manchester in 2019.

Lucy Renton

Associate Professor

Lucy Renton

Lucy Renton studied Fine Art at St. Martin’s School of Art and the Royal College of Art, and is currently working towards a Professional Doctorate in Fine Art at the University of East London.

Lucy’s research addresses the experience of excess in colour, repetition, and ornament, with recent artworks using an expanded definition of printmaking, drawn and painted figure and line, and appropriated domestic objects and patterns.

Lucy is currently artist in residence on the Arts Council funded Bummock project, led by artists Danica Maier and Andrew Bracey. This five-year research project explores artists’ use of archives, including the Nottingham Lace Archive, where Lucy has been researching and making work, participating by invitation in the Nottingham Trent University ‘Summer Lodge’ artist workshops in 2016/17. In October 2016 Lucy co-curated the artist residency and symposium inside inside in the parallel programme of the 3rd Istanbul Design Biennale.

Andrea Stokes

Associate Professor, Fine Art

My research is through a Fine Art practice that uses video, drawing and publication to interrogate space and place, informed by a feminist politic that treats ourselves, our bodies and histories as material.

andrea stokessmall

Recent work includes: Net Curtain (2014) a collaborative drawing made by 25 women creating trompe-l’oeil curtains in the Thelma Hulbert Gallery situated in the historic lace-making town of Honiton, reanimating the presence of the overlooked eponymous artist and engendering conversations about women’s work and the textiles industry.

Contemporary Dance for Beginners (2014) a video made and shown at the Whitechapel Idea Store, an iconic building and controversial replacement for the local library. Working alongside the women participants of a ten-week evening class I inhabit and map space through the repetition of choreographed dance sequences.

In current work resulting from a residency in Northern Greenland, I adopt the persona of Captain Janeway from the US TV franchise Start Trek, inhabiting the site of a controversial zinc mine with an embodiment of imperialism.

andreastokes.com

Robin Tarbet

Senior Lecturer

Robin Tarbet’s practice is concerned with the physical materiality of everyday technology, from consumer products to industrial systems. Much of his research resolves around the notion of examining the residue of technological progress and he creates physical responses to data in the form of futuristic monuments, fossil ruins and present day technological relics. Tarbet assumes the role of a curious folk scientific explorer, which leads him to dismantle, dissect, and distort everyday technologies and appliances to examine the aesthetic and conceptual properties of the built environment to the increasingly complex yet mysterious worlds within. It is with this real stuff that his own fascination with perceived reality, science fiction, illusion and the unusual effects of scale and perspective combine. As an artist he substitutes his precise lack of technical understanding with the notion of play, imagination and the potential for what could be, rather than what is.

ROBIN_TARBET copy
Orange Buckets (2016)

The image is from a 9 minute film titled Orange Buckets (2016) which documents myself on site at Wylfa Nuclear Power station in Anglesey, and it is exhibited as a singe screen installation as part of the touring exhibition Power In The Land.

robintarbet.com/

Alexis Teplin

Senior Lecturer in Fine Art

Alexis Teplin’s practice is routed in painting and performance that extends to include sculpture and large scale installation. Concerned with the language of abstraction, Teplin constructs performative installations based in seduction, artificiality and cultural signification.

AlexisTeplinsmall.jpg
Arch (The Politics of Fragmentation) 2016

Exhibitions include Arch (The Politics of Fragmentation), the 20th Sydney Biennale, Drag, Push HOOT, Mary Mary, Glasgow, HE and HO for O, Rise Projects, Silvie Fleming Collection, London, Sacre 101 – An exhibition based on the Rite of Spring, P and C, Migros Museum, Zurich, San Marino Calling, Museo D’Arte Modena e Contemporanea, San Marino, sss T !!, Hayward Gallery, Project Space, London, The Party, performances at Tramway for Glasgow International, Glasgow and the Serpentine Gallery, SANAA Pavilion, London.

Roman Vasseur

Senior Lecturer

Roman Vasseur
The Franchise, © 2008. Single Channel Video / no audio / looped Sequence duration: 4.25 min. Displayed on Plasma screen.

My artworks, curatorial projects and writing redeploys fragments of cinema, architecture and cultural narratives to explore conflicting or transitional materialities and economies. The transportation of a crate of earth from Transylvania to Los Angeles via London and New York resulted in the merging of a gothic fiction with the banalities of transporting a material to its cinematic point of origin. More recently I was commissioned to reinterpret a post war town’s master plan, questioning the role of art in its original vision. The ensuing art works questioned the function of these spaces and objects in the present and the how economies of information supersede and alter these objects potential for agency.

I have exhibited at Cubitt Gallery, London (solo), the ICA, London, Jeffrey Charles Gallery, London, Project, Dublin and Raid Projects, Los Angeles. I have contributed to conferences and panel discussions at Tate Britain, the ICA and Milton Keynes Gallery and published with Mute Magazine and the Journal of Visual Arts Practices.